Monthly Archives: May 2016

How to Get Beautiful Herbs With Easy Way

There are many herbs that are as beautiful as they are tasty, which makes them perfect for growing containers, either on their own or in a mixed pot. Herbs are generally easy to grow and many are drought resistant and thrive on neglect, which are also good characteristics for container plants. You can use herbs in hanging baskets as well as traditional containers and don’t hesitate to experiment growing them with other plants.

Another great thing about herbs is that generally, the more you pick, the fuller and better the plant will look. That said, you want to be careful not to pick so much that you leave a giant hole in your container.

Many herbs also have beautiful flowers and some are edible and delicious. However, some herbs, like basil, once they flower become bitter.

Oregano is one of my favorite herbs for containers. It is incredibly forgiving, scoffs at drought and likes poor soil so doesn’t need much fertilizer. It is a low growing plant with small leaves and will drape over the sides of containers, so can be used as a “spiller,”though it won’t spread too much.

Of all the oregano varieties, golden oregano (Origanum vulgare ‘Aureum’) is my favorite because it can add a bright spot to any container.

Oregano loves lots of sun and is a perennial in zones 5-8. To keep plant thriving, don’t over water and keep pruning back. Oregano needs good drainage.

If plant starts getting leggy, cut back and wait a few weeks for recovery. You can propagate oregano by rooting it in water.

Trees on growing tips

Whether you are limited on space, growing plants that don’t usually survive your local weather or just looking to create focal points, container trees and shrubs can be a lovely addition to your landscape. However, there are some considerations that you will need to remember in order to help them stay happy and healthy.

Research to Determine What Trees and Shrubs Are Best

One big mistake that some gardeners make is falling in love with a plant online or at a nursery and whisking it home with nary a thought as to whether it will actually work in your garden. This is especially true when you are trying to place a tree or shrub in a container. The cute little sapling that you spied at the garden center can turn into a tree that is over 100 feet tall.

The basics that you should check out for potential candidates include:

  • Preferred hardiness zones
  • Height and width at maturity
  • Light and water requirements
  • Potential for litter

Use Dwarf Cultivars as Available

You are asking a lot of a tree or shrub when you place it into a container.

The roots have far less space to work with and can naturally become crowded. When you choose dwarf cultivars and species that are naturally on the smaller size, it is easier for them to adapt to the limited area presented. This is especially important when you are working with fruit trees since they will need extra energy to produce fruit and you want a good root base.

Choose Your Pot Size Carefully

Picking the right size of container for your tree or shrub can be a bit tricky at first. You do not want one that is too small, of course, as this will leave little room for root growth and it is likely to become rootbound and struggle or die. Since it is a large plant, you might naturally think to place it in a very large container so it will have room even when it is fully grown.

However, you can definitely run into problems if the pot is too large for the plant’s current size. When there is an abundance of soil present and not enough roots to take up the water, it can retain moisture for too long and cause root rots that can ultimately kill the plant.

For best results, plan on moving up in 2” increments every couple of years until it reaches maturity. Repot sooner if you notice roots escaping from the drainage holes. If it is rootbound when you change containers, perform root pruning by use a box cutter or other sharp instrument to score along the sides of the root ball and remove the mass of roots. This will stimulate new root growth and keep the plant healthier.

Drainage is Essential

Even if you have the correct size of container, you can run into root rot and other problems if there are not enough drainage openings present. Check your pot (especially if you are using an alternative form of planter like a barrel or bucket that is not necessarily sold with drainage holes) and use a drill to create more as needed.

Protect the Roots in Freezing Weather

Many trees and shrubs have adapted for survival through the harsh conditions present during winter. Growth slows and the plant goes into dormancy. The roots are protected by the ground surrounding them and the temperatures are at least a little higher than in the air above.

In a container, there is a lot less buffer present for the roots. It is much easier for the soil to freeze completely and cause damage. Options are to bring the plant inside, bury it in the ground or place it somewhere like a garage or basement. If you choose to bury them, add mulch on top for extra protection and leave a space around the trunk to prevent insect and disease damage.

Don’t Forget to Harden Off Your Plants

If you are trying to grow plants in containers so that you can bring them inside when the temperatures drop, take it slow when you reintroduce them to the outdoors in the following spring. This process is called hardening off and is an essential step in protecting your trees and shrubs from harm.

Container Gardening For Begginers

unduhan-42Anyone can learn how to container garden. Seriously. I used to be a confirmed slayer of all plants. My thumb was not green, it was a destroyer of green. However, over time I learned how to keep plants in containers alive, at least for the most part. I still do kill plants–on a fairly regular basis–but have come to the conclusion that all gardeners do. It’s just part of the deal. A reas

For me, the pleasure of gardening far outweighs the inevitable pain of losing plants. One of the ways to achieve this is to take guilt out of the equation of gardening. There is a learning curve and with each failure, if you can take the knowledge and experience from that, it will make you a better gardener.

The good news is that there can be huge joy in container gardening even with inevitable plant death.

onable goal goal, over time, is to kill fewer and fewer plants.

Here’s the thing. You can grow gorgeous container gardens even if you have very little sunand you can grow gorgeous containers if you are drenched in sun all day long (or anything in between for that matter). However, for your container gardens to thrive, much less be spectacular, you need to accurately assess how much sun your pot or garden will get. And here’s a warning. If you just guess, or think you know how much sun exposure an area gets, chances are very high that you will be wrong–by a lot.

No matter how good a gardener you are, the tendency I have seen again and again (ok, I’m guilty too) is to grossly overestimate how much sun an area gets.

The first thing you should do is figure out, either by timing with a watch, or using a sun calculator, how much direct sun your containers will get. You need to do this close to the time of year that you are going to plant, because in the depths of winter, the sun is in a different place than it is in the summer. The amount of sun your pots get will determine what you can plant in them. You can’t know what will successfully grow, unless you know how much sun the plants will have.